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Wednesday, May 23, 2018

More Botai genomes (Jeong et al. 2018 preprint)


Over at bioRxiv at this LINK. Actually, these may or may not be the same Botai genomes that have already been published along with Damgaard et al. 2018 (see comments below for the discussion about that). Here's the abstract. Emphasis is mine:

The indigenous populations of inner Eurasia, a huge geographic region covering the central Eurasian steppe and the northern Eurasian taiga and tundra, harbor tremendous diversity in their genes, cultures and languages. In this study, we report novel genome-wide data for 763 individuals from Armenia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Mongolia, Russia, Tajikistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. We furthermore report genome-wide data of two Eneolithic individuals (~5,400 years before present) associated with the Botai culture in northern Kazakhstan. We find that inner Eurasian populations are structured into three distinct admixture clines stretching between various western and eastern Eurasian ancestries. This genetic separation is well mirrored by geography. The ancient Botai genomes suggest yet another layer of admixture in inner Eurasia that involves Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in Europe, the Upper Paleolithic southern Siberians and East Asians. Admixture modeling of ancient and modern populations suggests an overwriting of this ancient structure in the Altai-Sayan region by migrations of western steppe herders, but partial retaining of this ancient North Eurasian-related cline further to the North. Finally, the genetic structure of Caucasus populations highlights a role of the Caucasus Mountains as a barrier to gene flow and suggests a post-Neolithic gene flow into North Caucasus populations from the steppe.


Jeong et al., Characterizing the genetic history of admixture across inner Eurasia, Posted May 23, 2018, doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/327122

See also...

New PCA featuring Botai horse tamers, Hun and Saka warriors, and many more...

29 comments:

Anonymous said...




Botai has two R1b1a1 now.


rozenfag said...

I have a suspicion that they analyzed the same Botai samples as Copenhagen team did. Just compare:

Copenhagen paper:

BOT2016
mtDNA: Z1a

BOT14
mtDNA: K1b2
Y-DNA: R-M478(R1b1a1)

BOT15
mtDNA: R1b1
Y-DNA: N-M231

This paper:

TU45 M K1b2 R1b1a1
BKZ001 F Z1

So it may happen than TU45 = BOT14, BKZ001 = BOT2016.

Davidski said...

@rozenfag

Yeah, maybe they are.

In any case, it's interesting to see on the map that faint east to west trail of R1b-M343 (xM269) from the Urals to western Finland. That might have something to do with the early migration of Uralics to the East Baltic.

I'm not saying that Botai people were Proto-Uralic-speakers, but they or closely related groups similar to West_Siberia_N, may have had contacts with them.

Synome said...

Jaakko Haakinen believes that the ancestor language to Proto-Uralic was originally from east of the Urals, based on similarities shared with more eastern languages like Yukaghir and the Altaic group that must have occurred before the breakup of PU.

This R1b Y haplo distribution might lend support to that theory.

Davidski said...

@Synome

Yes, he posted about that at this blog once or twice.

Anthony Haken said...

Regardless of R1b-M343 the N-M231 branch found in BOT15 is Y6503 or N2* which is highly divergent from all other N. It likely has nothing to do with Uralic expansion at all.

Y6503+ is now found only in the Balkans. It was found in the Pre-Scythian Ir1 from Hungary.

Ric Hern said...

Does this point to a Pre-Mesolithic/Pre-Epi-Paleolithic Migration of Haplogroup R from East of the Urals taking a Northern Route into Europe with occasional Southward Pushes after +-18 000 YBP ? So Haplogroup R didn't migrate through Southern Central Asia to Europe ?

Ric Hern said...

What Haplogroups or proposed Macro-Haplogroup can be most closely linked to ANE currently ?

Davidski said...

@Anthony Haken

Regardless of R1b-M343 the N-M231 branch found in BOT15 is Y6503 or N2* which is highly divergent from all other N. It likely has nothing to do with Uralic expansion at all.

It obviously wasn't an important lineage in the Proto-Uralic expansion, but it may have been present in the Proto-Uralic population.

@Ric Hern

So Haplogroup R didn't migrate through Southern Central Asia to Europe?

I'm pretty sure it moved into Europe via Siberia while it was still home to overwhelmingly Ancient North Eurasian (ANE) populations.

Ric Hern said...

@ Davidski

Thanks

Davidski said...

@All

Troll post by Algan mardi removed.

He/she was claiming that there was no steppe ancestry in Bronze Age Greece or the Balkans, when in fact there is.

https://eurogenes.blogspot.com/2017/08/steppe-admixture-in-mycenaeans.html

http://eurogenes.blogspot.com/2017/05/steppe-invaders-in-bronze-age-balkans.html

Algan mardi said...

I can make a mistake but it does not make me a troll, the basic is said. Is your censorship science or dogma?

Davidski said...

@Algan mardi

You rambled a bunch of nonsense about no steppe ancestry in ancient Greece and the Balkans.

And you claimed that the ancient Anatolian samples were Hittites, when they're just Hittite-era, and probably Hattians or Hurrians. If you really believe that they are Hittites, that's fine, but keep in mind that there's no evidence of this in the paper.

At least attempt to get the basics right and be objective when you post here. It's not too much to ask.

Algan mardi said...

PIE homeland is Fertile Crescent

Davidski said...

@Algan mardi

PIE homeland is Fertile Crescent

That's not the consensus, for many good reasons.

Algan mardi said...

I not claimed that the ancient Anatolian samples were Hittites.
the authors of the paper did.

Davidski said...

@Algan mardi

I not claimed that the ancient Anatolian samples were Hittites. The authors of the paper did.

No they didn't. They classified them by historical period and location.

Three of these samples were from the Assyrian colonies period, and two from the Old Hittite period.

But no one knows who they were, and if they were Hittites, Hattians, Hurrians or Assyrians.

Davidski said...

By the way, quit spamming my blog comments.

AWood said...

@Ric Hern

Probably R. Between now and 24,000 ybp there have been gradual inputs that have created EHG and so forth. R1 is probably a better fit to EHG though. It would be interesting to see some ancient R1b(xL754) from Asia, although those might turn out like Botai, somewehere between EHG and ANE.

Ric Hern said...

@ AWood

Thanks. So was Ust Ishim Man before ANE formation then ?

Lee Albee said...

@Hern. Much older than ANE. AnE or beringia populations split from east asia about 25k years ago.

Ric Hern said...

@ Lee Albee

Thanks.

Aniasi said...

Can someone explain who these Botai people are, and what their relationship with other groups would be?

All I can understand is that they are West Siberian HG descendants of ANE, but not the same ANE that mixed with WHG to make EHG... is this correct?

Shaikorth said...

@Aniasi
Botai are like Neolithic West Siberian HG's but a bit more Baikal HG-shifted (can be modeled as WSHG+ShamankaEN).
The actual Neolithic WSHG's are close to the ANE in EHG's - maybe closer than anything else found so far - since modeling EHG's as WSHG+WHG using qpAdm works quite well.

Aniasi said...

@Shaikorth

Thanks! What do we know of these Baikal HG and their relationship to WSHG?

Shaikorth said...

@Aniasi
Damgaard et al. suggested they were a previously unknown isolated East Eurasian population that separated from the Han branch post-LGM but that may not be the full picture, they appear to have some ANE (Daur+AG3 works in qpAdm) which wasn't tested in the paper.

Aniasi said...

@Shaikorth

That eastern admixture is what excludes them as the source of WSHG in South Asians, correct?

Shaikorth said...

Baikal HG is quite similar to certain modern Tungusic peoples, I don't think anyone has even suggested any direct admixture in South Asia. WSHG and maybe Botai are another matter. Narasimhan says WSHG was present back in Indus_Periphery. Botai gives the strongest ANE-related f3 signal in Iron Age Swat but they didn't use it in any other tests in that preprint.

Matt said...

@Davidski, do you think it will be possible for you to calculate Fst scores with any of the new samples from the Damgaard papers in particular? And a set of populations similar to the last matrix you provided (though ideally with Ulchi as well and really ideally more world populations).

I'd like to try and put them through the Fst PCoA and some other forms of analysis, to see if any of them are extreme in drift beyond present day populations, especially the Shamanka_EN / BA, Okunevo and Botai.

The early tweets on the Shamanka_EN described them as very homogenous, so I'd like to see if they are homogenous (and drifted) beyond present day East Eurasian populations, as indicated by a particularly high Fst against outgroups.